Up to ten seats up for grabs as blue collar workers shift support from government

Courtney GouldNCA NewsWire
Not Supplied
Camera IconNot Supplied Credit: News Corp Australia

Part time, blue collar workers could put the Morrison government’s re-election chances at risk as new analysis shows the voter group is turning its back on the Coalition.

Analysis of Newspoll’s conducted between July and September show up to ten seats across the country could be up for grabs as Queensland remains as the only mainland stronghold for the Coalition.

Support nationally for the Coalition dropped to 38 per cent, down three points from the previous quarter.

Victoria, traditionally Labor’s strongest state, has experienced the largest swing against the government, with Labor leading by a margin of 58/42 per cent.

Support nationally for the Coalition is down three points from the previous quarter. Adam Taylor
Camera IconSupport nationally for the Coalition is down three points from the previous quarter. Adam Taylor Credit: Supplied

In Scott Morrison’s home state of NSW, the Coalition suffered a three point swing against it, with its primary vote dropping to 39 per cent. It puts Labor ahead by 52/48 on a two party preferred basis.

Following Western Australia’s historic state election loss, support for the government is down two points to 37 per cent. On a two party preferred basis, federal Labor leads 54/46, a nine point decline since the 2019 election.

Queensland is the Coalition’s last stronghold with a 55/45 per cent lead, with primary support unchanged since the last quarter.

South Australia has emerged as a spot of hope for the government, where support for the Coalition lifted three points to 40 per cent, however it still lags behind Labor on a two party preferred basis: 47/53 per cent.

It comes as part-time, blue collar, non-tertiary educated and low to middle income workers have shifted their support from the Coalition towards Labor.

Newspoll analysis has revealed support among votes with no tertiary education has fallen from 43 per cent to 38 per cent.

Voters who benefited most from the Budget’s tax cuts – those on incomes from $50,000 to $99,000 – have also turned their backs on the government.

Support in that group has fallen from 42 per cent to 38 per cent while support for Labor has grown to five points to 40 per cent.

Women have also turned away from the Coalition, with support dropping from 41 per cent to 37 per cent.

Mr Morrison’s performance has fallen nine points on the last survey to 48 per cent, with a net approval rating of zero nationally.

Originally published as Up to ten seats up for grabs as blue collar workers shift support from government

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