Industry remembers live export pioneer

The West Australian
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The northern cattle industry has paid tribute to live export pioneer Sid Parker, who died in his Darwin home early Monday morning.

Mr Parker, an Order of Australia recipient for his contribution to the Australian livestock industry, was a founding father of the northern live cattle trade to Asia.

The 88-year-old will be remembered for his leadership and vision for the industry, including pioneering Australian cattle exports to the Philippines and his involvement with South East Asian Livestock Export Services in the Malaysian, Indonesian and Vietnamese markets.

Born in the central Queensland town of Comet, Mr Parker served in the Royal Australian Navy during World War II, after which he worked for Vesteys Pastoral Company in the Northern Territory.

It was during this time that he was introduced to the live export trade as a cattle buyer for US interests exporting cattle to Hong Kong.

After a stint as Territory manager for the operations for pastoralist Sir William Gun, Mr Parker returned to the live export business in the early 1970s with exporter Carabao.

In the early 1990s, Mr Parker established South East Asian Livestock Services with former Carabao colleague John Kaus.

A founding member of the Northern Territory Livestock Exporters' Association, Mr Parker served as its chairman in the 1990s and 2000s.

In 2000, to commemorate Mr Parker's 75th birthday, the Northern Territory Government commissioned a book in his honour, titled "Old Sid - The Life and Times of Sid Parker".

He was inducted to the Livestock Exporters Hall of Fame in October, 2002.

Mr Parker was also committee member of the Darwin Turf Club from 1968 to 2000, serving as chairman and vice-chairman during that time, and was inducted in the Northern Territory Racing Hall of Fame in 1997.

Mr Parker is survived by wife Elvie.

A funeral service will be held at the St Mary's Star of the Sea Catholic Church in Darwin on Tuesday, January 14 at 9.30am.

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