Tuckwell bid for CBH board

Rueben HaleThe West Australian
Kondinin grower Lindsay Tuckwell will be the first CBH female grower member to be on the board of directors if she wins the co-operative's District Three board elections in February next year.
Camera IconKondinin grower Lindsay Tuckwell will be the first CBH female grower member to be on the board of directors if she wins the co-operative's District Three board elections in February next year. Credit: Rueben Hale

Kondinin farmer Lindsay Tuckwell could become the first female grower member elected to the CBH board, after announcing her nomination to stand in next year’s director elections.

Ms Tuckwell, whose previous attempt in 2012 to be voted to the board was unsuccessful, was encouraged to nominate as a candidate for District Three by vacating board member John Hassell.

“It is great that women are now acknowledged as part of a farming enterprise, and it’s only obvious that we should be represented on boards,” she said.

Ms Tuckwell said gender diversity was essential for a progressive co-operative to face the challenges of the future, as was the need for board members to be chosen on their merit and ability.

She said she had hands-on experience as a grower, with the Tuckwell family this year managing their biggest cropping program yet — 3400ha planted to wheat, barley and canola.

Ms Tuckwell also became known in recent years for her participation in the bid to keep Tier 3 rail lines open, spearheading the campaign alongside Bruce Rock grower Jane Fuchsbichler, and has been an active member of the Growers’ Advisory Council and the Wheatbelt Business Network.

From 2009 to 2015, Ms Tuckwell was a Kondinin Shire councillor, acting as deputy shire president for the last two years of her tenure.

If elected next year, Ms Tuckwell said she intended to continue to advocate for Tier 3 rail lines to be reopened.

“Getting our grain from farm to port to market in a timely fashion is critical,” she said.

“In the old days when you delivered your product to CBH, they had longer lead time before they had to ship it.

“We were in a pool, so timeliness wasn’t such a factor as it is now. Marketers need the grain shipped to their buyers as soon as possible.

“So instead of it being a gradual 12 to 18-month shipping schedule, it is almost immediate.”

Ms Tuckwell also emphasised the importance of the Economic Industry and Standing Committee’s inquiry into the management of the State’s freight rail network.

“All growers should read it to see how the State Government’s decision in 2000 to sell the freight rail services in WA has been impacting the industry,” she said.

“Growers have been sold out subsequently after becoming beholden to a 49-year lease with Brookfield/Arc Infrastructure a decade later, which is the best interests of its shareholders and not growers. The WA Labor Government has said it is supportive of keeping grain on rail, but ... I am unsure it will have the money to do anything about it.”

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