AM briefing: Megxit interview imminent, female reporters beat detractor and McKechnie’s fraud probe call

The West Australian
Here are five must-read stories from The West Australian this morning.
Camera IconHere are five must-read stories from The West Australian this morning.

The royal family is concerned that Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, will detail her falling out with the Duchess of Cambridge during the much-publicised Oprah interview, set to air imminently in the US.

Find out why a derogatory comment about The West Australian’s female reporters was actually a massive compliment, pointing out the female talent on our team.

WA’s former top corruption fighter wants the Department of Communities subjected to a “wide-ranging” inquiry to establish how the State’s worst case of public sector fraud went undetected for a decade.

Pill testing at music festivals would not increase use of MDMA, according to new West Australian research and WA consumer confidence is at an 11-year high after COVID lockdown success.

Here are five must-read stories from The West Australian this morning.

Prince William hopeful of Harry reunion after ‘bombshell’ Oprah interview

Prince William is hoping that he can reconcile with Prince Harry despite fears Meghan will address the breakdown of her relationship with Kate in her Oprah interview.

The royal family is concerned that Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, will detail her falling out with the Duchess of Cambridge as well as claims of institutional racism.

In the biggest airing of royal dirty laundry since Princess Diana’s BBC Panorama interview in 1995, the Queen’s courtiers were expecting awkward questions to be raised.

Read the full story here.

The Oprah interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle airs in the US this morning.
Camera IconThe Oprah interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle airs in the US this morning. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA

‘Man hating feminists’: Attacks from detractors show how right we are

“Disgusting identity politics”.

That’s how one of our detractors, Jason, chose to describe the thought-provoking, intelligent, well-researched, fact-based stories and commentary from our female writers.

He thinks his post on our reporters is a criticism, but actually, it’s a massive compliment to point out the female talent on our team.

Read the full story here.

Just some of The West Australian’s female reporters.
Camera IconJust some of The West Australian’s female reporters.

John McKechnie calls for wide-ranging inquiry into Department of Communities

WA’s former top corruption fighter wants the Department of Communities subjected to a “wide-ranging” inquiry to establish how the State’s worst case of public sector fraud went undetected for a decade.

After helping uncover the conduct of corrupt public servant Paul Whyte — who has already pleaded guilty to siphoning more than $22 million out of the department through fake invoicing schemes — John McKechnie revealed his belief that the government agency should be subjected to a broader independent probe.

“The fact was there were a series of unqualified audits and there were a lot of red flags that were missed,” he said.

Read the full story here.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John McKechnie says a far reaching probe is needed.
Camera IconRetired Supreme Court Justice John McKechnie says a far reaching probe is needed. Credit: Michael Wilson/The West Australian

Research finds pill testing at festivals ‘doesn’t encourage’ MDMA use

Allowing pill testing at music festivals would not increase use of MDMA, according to new West Australian research that counters one of the leading arguments against the controversial measure.

The Edith Cowan University study comes just over a year after a parliamentary inquiry recommended trialling drug checking services at events like Falls Festival or Groovin the Moo. The recommendation was subsequently rejected by the McGowan Government.

Read the full story here.

New research says pill testing at festivals does not encourage drug use.
Camera IconNew research says pill testing at festivals does not encourage drug use. Credit: Justin Benson-Cooper/The Sunday Times

WA consumer confidence at 11-year high after coronavirus lockdown success

West Australians have shrugged off their five-day lockdown hangover and are banking on the successful rollout of coronavirus vaccines as consumer confidence across the State reaches an 11-year high.

The State Government’s handling of the pandemic continues to be the major factor underpinning rising sentiment, according to the WA Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s latest measure of consumer confidence, which is now at a level not seen since March 2010.

People’s confidence in their own personal finances has also reached a 51/2-year high.

Read the full story here.

WA consumer confidence is at an 11-year high, partly due to the vaccine rollout.
Camera IconWA consumer confidence is at an 11-year high, partly due to the vaccine rollout. Credit: Paul Kane/Getty Images

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