Bali travellers urged to be vigilant of African swine fever

Zach RelphCountryman
Indonesia’s Ministry of Agriculture has confirmed African swine fever has been detected in North Sumatra.
Camera IconIndonesia’s Ministry of Agriculture has confirmed African swine fever has been detected in North Sumatra. Credit: Ian Neubauer

WA holidaymakers travelling to Bali this festive period are being urged to exercise caution and declare goods when returning to Australia to protect pork producers from a ravaging swine virus.

Indonesia’s Ministry of Agriculture has confirmed African swine fever has been detected in North Sumatra.

It comes after local media reported last month that the Medan Veterinary Centre found 4000 pigs at several sites near Medan, in Northern Sumatra, had died from the virus.

With almost 200 flights weekly between Australia and Indonesia, one of the country’s most popular holiday destinations, Federal Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie called for caution.

“There are about 188 flights a week from Indonesia direct into Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Cairns, Perth, Adelaide and Darwin,” she said.

“Bali is a favourite holiday destination for Australians and it’s also a region with a lot of pigs.

“My department has already raised the risk status of flights from Indonesia and is increasing screening, interventions and scrutiny of travellers.

“I’d appeal to anyone travelling between Australia and Bali and elsewhere in Indonesia to be extra diligent about declaring what they’re bringing back in.”

In addition to Indonesia, ASF has been detected in China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, North Korea, South Korea, Philippines, East Timor and parts of eastern Europe.

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