Police find human remains believed to be murder victim Wade Dunn in Udumung Nature Reserve in Wheatbelt

Phil HickeyThe West Australian
Wade Dunn.
Camera IconWade Dunn. Credit: WA Police/WA Police

Police have found human remains in bushland north-east of Perth believed to be that of a man who was brutally murdered in 2015.

Wade Dunn, 40, was last seen alive in May 2015 at an Alexander Heights home.

Detectives later charged drug dealers Gary David Jackson and his cousin Mark David Corbett over his murder.

During a subsequent Supreme Court trial the court was told that Mr Dunn’s killers cut him up with a chainsaw after beating him to death.

Jackson and Corbett were both convicted and were sentenced to 22 years and 13 years jail respectively.

The trial was told that the men repeatedly hit the 40-year-old with an iron bar, before dismembering his body and dumping his remains in bush north of Bindoon but his body was never found.

In a statement issued on Tuesday police confirmed human remains had been found in a remote area of the Udumung Nature Reserve in Wannamal in the Wheatbelt on Monday.

“No formal identification has been completed, however, the remains are believed to be that of Wade Dunn,” the statement said.

“Homicide squad and forensics are currently at the location and are expected to be in attendance tomorrow.”

It’s unclear at this stage how the discovery has come about.

But police and Mr Dunn’s family have carried out numerous searches for his remains in recent years.

In January 2017 police searched bush north north of Bindoon just off the Great Northern Highway but no signs of Mr Dunn’s remains were located.

In May that same year the Seven Mile Well Nature Reserve area, about 40km north of Bindoon, was also searched.

A detective searches a garage in the murder of Wade Dunn.
Camera IconA detective searches a garage in the murder of Wade Dunn. Credit: Sharon Smith/WA News

Several years ago Dunn's mother Robyn Hudson launched a Go-Fundme campaign to carry out her own search with the help of an Aboriginal tracker.

Speaking outside court after Jackson was sentenced to life behind bars for her son’s death, Ms Hudson told of the pain of not knowing where her son’s remains were buried.

“What we really want is to find Wade so that his children and the rest of his family and friends can have closure,” she said at the time, adding that the gruesome details of her son’s final minutes was difficult to deal with.

“We were told what they did to Wade three months before the trial,” she said.

“When they told us … I think we must have been in shock because I cried for two seconds flat and that was it.

“It wasn’t until the trial started … I completely lost the plot and couldn’t go back to the trial for that week.”

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