Satellite tech ensures cattle water monitored

Zach RelphCountryman
Farmbot business development manager Nick Bradley says the unit is an innovative water monitoring tool.
Camera IconFarmbot business development manager Nick Bradley says the unit is an innovative water monitoring tool. Credit: Zach Relph

Satellite technology has been hailed as a critical water-monitoring tool to provide pastoralists with near real-time water level updates and ensure thirsty cattle remain hydrated.

The Farmbot is a remote water-level monitor, designed to inform pastoralists and farmers of water levels, leaks and usage trends.

It uses satellite or 4G technology to provide near real-time access to water updates in an effort to slash time spent driving to visually inspect water points.

Speaking on the sidelines at last Friday’s Kimberley Pilbara Cattlemen’s Association conference in Broome, Farmbot business development manager Nick Bradley heralded the unit.

Mr Bradley said it improved pastoralist and farmers’ water management.

“In the pastoral industry, innovation equates to improved animal welfare, improved profitability and improved peace of mind,” he said.

“A Farmbot is ag-tech which delivers improvements on all three of those.

“Water us the very lifeblood of all agriculture and keeping track of water sources is very much on the minds of everyone in the industry.”

More than 3000 Farmbots have been engaged by pastoralists and farmers across Australia, with about 1200 operating in WA including at Wallareenya Station, about 50km south of Port Hedland.

Mr Bradley said the Farmbot would not eliminate the need to visually check water points, but would reduce travel time and fuel costs spent driving for visual inspections.

“It is about doing the bore run when you want to do it and having the information at hand to avoid disasters,” he said.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails