Locusts in crosshairs

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Jenne BrammerCountryman
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DAFWA biosecurity officers Ken Talbot and Kelly Manning with entomologist Svetlana Micic (centre) discuss APL surveillance.
Camera IconDAFWA biosecurity officers Ken Talbot and Kelly Manning with entomologist Svetlana Micic (centre) discuss APL surveillance. Credit: Countryman

The Department of Agriculture and Food WA this week began surveying for Australian Plague Locusts in the central Wheatbelt and is urging farmers to check paddocks for activity.

The targeted surveillance followed concerns of increased locust activity in spring, because of the wet summer earlier this year.

The increased locust activity is predicted across eastern and southern parts of the grainbelt.

Department invasive species manager Tim Stevens said targeted surveillance had begun around Merredin.

“Staff will survey pasture paddocks, in liaison with property owners, focusing on potential high- density areas first which have been identified from the autumn survey data,” Mr Stevens said.

“The aim of this surveillance is to confirm the accuracy of predictions and provide information to help landholders to make timely decisions on control.”

Landholders are reminded to inspect their properties for locust activity and start preparing for control if necessary.

Autumn surveys completed by DAFWA indicate moderate density hatchings are likely, which may result in locust bands and loose swarms, in parts of Ravensthorpe, Jerramungup, Gnowangerup, Lake Grace, Kulin, Yilgarn, Westonia, Mukinbudin and Nungarin shires. Variable hatchings are also likely to occur in other areas.

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[https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/diseases/pestfax-reporter|] ''''''

[https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/invasive-species/biosecurity-alert-australian-plague-locust?page=0%2C1|]

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