Narrogin mates made for wool trade

Bob GarnantCountryman
Narrogin business partners Laurie Dunn and Kyle Gumprich have joined forces in the wool oddment trade.
Camera IconNarrogin business partners Laurie Dunn and Kyle Gumprich have joined forces in the wool oddment trade. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman

Sometimes, two is better than one.

That is the thought process which encouraged Narrogin businessmen Laurie Dunn and Kyle Gumprich to join forces and trade wool.

“We thought it better to work together than against one another,” Mr Gumprich said.

“Together, and with Laurie’s experience, our goal is to offer woolgrowers the best price in the trade.”

Mr Dunn, a 50-year wool veteran who trades as LC and HM Dunn, and Mr Gumprich, whose trading business is called WA Wools, formed the 50-50 joint venture about six months ago.

Under the brand Rural Rest, the Narrogin-based traders sold a 19 micron line of fleece wool for 1153¢/kg greasy through Landmark at the Western Wool Centre on January 29.

So far, they have sold 700 bales together.

Mr Dunn said the partnership was a good fit.

“We are looking at trading 1500 bales annually from approximately 300 clients,” the 73-year-old said.

“With both of us living with our wives and families in Narrogin, we will be forming good relationships with local woolgrowers, which seems to give us the edge in what can be a competitive business.

“We believe sheep numbers, both meat and wool types, should remain at consistent numbers in the Great Southern, which will keep the industry ticking over reasonably well.”

Mr Dunn was raised in Narrogin and has a long-standing connection with the Wheatbelt community.

Mr Gumprich was based in Perth, but relocated to Narrogin about 12 years ago.

Mr Dunn said: “Working in this specialised industry while living in the country is a very enjoyable lifestyle.

“Our working asset is a 200-bale storage facility, where we sort wool into appropriate lines, but it is our personalise service that gives us a distinct advantage.”

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