Southern Wheatbelt farmers give an insight into life in agriculture

Isabel VieiraNarrogin Observer
Brookton woolgrower Ellen Walker, of Warranine Park, hosted the shearing and woolhandling training camp.
Camera IconBrookton woolgrower Ellen Walker, of Warranine Park, hosted the shearing and woolhandling training camp. Credit: Countryman

Southern Wheatbelt farmers took a break from harvest to celebrate National Agriculture Day with a breakfast at Brookton Rural Traders last Friday.

To mark the occasion, BRT’s Tamara Lilly and Anton de Lange, and Alco Willems from David Grays Aglink conducted a series of interviews with local farmers about their careers in agriculture and their advice for the next generation of farmers.

“We wanted to do something a little bit different and connect with our community and our farmers, especially across the broad range of agriculture that they are involved in,” Ms Lilly said.

“During the interviews I asked a series of questions such as how long they have been in agriculture, what they love about it, who is someone they admire or has inspired them.

“The last question was what advice would they give to people considering having a career in agriculture.”

Brookton farmer Callum Smith from Little Farm Eggs.
Camera IconBrookton farmer Callum Smith from Little Farm Eggs. Credit: Brookton Rural Traders/Brookton Rural Traders

The theme of this year’s National Agriculture Day was celebrating career opportunities in the industry.

“We wanted to be able to share what pathways were available for people possibly considering a career in agriculture,” Ms Lilly said.

“Just getting people connected with their community members in a different way.

“We really just wanted to capture the diversity and awesomeness of our farmers.”

At the event Dave Stead from Ansazi Agronomy and Doug Hanna from David Grays Aglink provided an agriculture sector supply update.

National Agriculture Day event at Brookton Rural Traders
Camera IconNational Agriculture Day event at Brookton Rural Traders Credit: Brookton Rural Traders/Brookton Rural Traders

One of the interviews featured Brookton’s Ellen Walker, who runs the family farm while raising her three daughters.

“Living and working in the rural area has its challenges but it also has its perks,” Ms Walker said. “I love the sense of community and that side of it, whereas I find the challenges of isolation and access to services a little difficult.

“It’s a great place to raise a family. We’ve got three girls who come to work with me most days.”

Ms Walker said her advice to young people looking to enter the industry would be to take every opportunity.

“It’s amazing what you can learn from a job that may sound fairly boring, like pushing sheep up a cradle,” she said.

“Never stop learning.

“You can always learn more from someone who is living or working in agriculture.”

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