#DearFarmer program to thank farmers

Zach RelphCountryman
Rural Aid chief executive John Warlters.
Camera IconRural Aid chief executive John Warlters. Credit: Rural Aid

An Australian charity focused on providing support to outback communities has launched a campaign to celebrate the nation's farmers, who have battled a torrid past year.

Rural Aid last week unveiled its #DearFarmer program for the community to share a "digital message of hope" with the nation's primary producers.

Rural Aid chief executive John Warlters said the agricultural landscape had been impacted by drought, a horror bushfire season and the coronavirus crisis.

He said the campaign aimed to let farmers know that their hardwork was valued, especially during testing conditions.

"We’d like to show our farmers and rural communities that we see and value them especially in uncertain times," Mr Warlters said.

“This year, we’ve taken this incredible initiative digital so, we can reach as many people as possible to send letters of hope.

“As we experience challenging times, our farmers continue to put food on our tables.

"Panic buying may put strain on our supply chains, but our farmers continue to have our backs by supplying beautiful Australian produce."

Mr Warlters encouraged people wanting to share a message of hope with a farmers to visit Rural Aid's website to write a digital letter.

He also said messages can be posted via social media, using the hashtag #DearFarmer and tagging @ruralaid.

“We’re asking Australians of all ages to show their Aussie spirit and share a note of hope on their favourite social media channel," Mr Warlters said.

An Australian charity focused on providing support to outback communities has launched a campaign to celebrate the nation's farmers, who have battled a torrid past year.

Rural Aid last week unveiled its #DearFarmer program for the community to share a "digital message of hope" with the nation's primary producers.

Rural Aid chief executive John Warlters said the agricultural landscape had been impacted by drought, a horror bushfire season and the coronavirus crisis.

He said the campaign aimed to let farmers know that their hardwork was valued, especially during testing conditions.

"We’d like to show our farmers and rural communities that we see and value them especially in uncertain times," Mr Warlters said.

“This year, we’ve taken this incredible initiative digital so, we can reach as many people as possible to send letters of hope.

“As we experience challenging times, our farmers continue to put food on our tables.

"Panic buying may put strain on our supply chains, but our farmers continue to have our backs by supplying beautiful Australian produce."

Mr Warlters encouraged people wanting to share a message of hope with a farmers to visit Rural Aid's website to write a digital letter.

He also said messages can be posted via social media, using the hashtag #DearFarmer and tagging @ruralaid.

“We’re asking Australians of all ages to show their Aussie spirit and share a note of hope on their favourite social media channel," Mr Warlters said.

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