Findings on CTF shared

Countryman
Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development officer Bindi Isbister in a crop which used the controlled traffic farming system.
Camera IconDepartment of Primary Industries and Regional Development officer Bindi Isbister in a crop which used the controlled traffic farming system. Credit: DPIRD

Explaining why a farmer might want new machinery to get “on track” formed part of a presentation on controlled traffic farming to participants of the Liebe Group Women’s Field Day last week.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development officer Bindi Isbister shared her findings on CTF, saying that new machinery may very well be needed to assist in getting a farm “on track”.

“A CTF farming system is built on permanent wheel tracks where the crop zone and traffic lanes are permanently separated to minimise the impact of machinery induced soil compaction,” she said.

“It requires matching of the operating widths and wheeltracks for all cropping machinery to reduce the area of the paddock wheeled, therefore investment in machinery or modifying existing equipment is usually required.

“Moving to a fully matched CTF system can be challenging if the farm machinery fleet is not well matched or existing machinery can’t be modified to suit.

“Therefore, buying new machinery may be required and the transition to CTF can be done in line with the farm machinery investment plan.”

Ms Isbister said DPIRD and Grains Research and Development Corporation research showed CTF could improve profitability and sustainability. “CTF increases profit through higher yield, better grain quality and reduced costs,” she said.

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