Anderson hits peak of $26k

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Bob GarnantCountryman
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With the $26,000 top-priced ram, was Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup, Elders Kojonup agent Alex Prowse and Nutrien Livestock agent Stuart Richardson.
Camera IconWith the $26,000 top-priced ram, was Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup, Elders Kojonup agent Alex Prowse and Nutrien Livestock agent Stuart Richardson. Credit: Countryman

Kojonup-bred Poll Merino rams were in hot demand at the Anderson family’s annual ram sale last Wednesday, as local and interstate buyers pushed prices to a top of $26,000 and a total clearance while setting a new WA record average price.

The Anderson Rams sale, conducted by Nutrien Livestock, and interfaced with AuctionsPlus, offered and sold 174 Poll Merino rams for an average price of $3961.

A total of 42 rams sold online, with 30 sold to six Victorian buyers.

Increased demand helped set a new WA record average price for a single vendor on-property auction and WA’s richest sale per head was up $1524 on last year when 147 rams sold for an average price of $2437.

The sale topper, Anderson 204, was knocked down to Elders agents Alex Prowse and Russell McKay, who were bidding on behalf of new buyer Paul O’Connor, who trades as Oxton Park in Harden, NSW.

Mr O’Connor, who runs a 10,500 commercial ewe flock, said he would put the ram to work in a 600-head nucleus flock to breed flock rams.

“We have used semen straws from an Anderson sire 170390, but this will be our first physical ram,” he said.

“Our flock has been non-mulesed since 2008 and we use Australian Sheep Breeding Values along with targeted subjective appraisal for our sire selections.

“The ram was selected on its ASBV fat, muscle and eye muscle growth, plus it had good wool cut and style.”

Anderson 204 recorded ASBVs of 12.0 PWT, 16.3 YWT, 2.2 YFAT, 2.9 YEMD, 27.8 YCFW, 3.0 YSS, 14.3 YSL, -74 YFEC, -0.5 LDAG and 213 DP+.

Mr O’Connor said he had marketed Oxton Park’s woolclip through New Zealand’s ZQ Merino integrity program, which included Responsible Wool Standard certification.

With the $21,000 second top-priced ram, was sheep classer Damien Meaburn, of Tasmania, Nutrien Livestock stud stock agent Mitchell Crosby, and Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup.
Camera IconWith the $21,000 second top-priced ram, was sheep classer Damien Meaburn, of Tasmania, Nutrien Livestock stud stock agent Mitchell Crosby, and Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup. Credit: Countryman

Also new to the sale, Tasmania-based sheep classer Damien Meaburn secured the $21,000 second top-priced ram on behalf of the Phillips family, who trade as Yarrawonga Merinos, in Cunningar, NSW.

Mr Meaburn, who flew to WA to secure a top ram, selected Anderson 150 as his first pick.

“He will be used as a stud sire in the Phillips family’s new Yarrawonga Plus stud designed to offer non-mules, high growth, high fat, plus muscle and reproductive traits, without losing fleece value,” he said.

“The ram also met our criteria for high worm resistance.”

With the $20,000 third top-priced ram, was buyer Marcus Sounness, of Amelup, Nutrien Livestock agent Stuart Richardson, and Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup.
Camera IconWith the $20,000 third top-priced ram, was buyer Marcus Sounness, of Amelup, Nutrien Livestock agent Stuart Richardson, and Anderson Rams principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup. Credit: Countryman

Amelup woolgrower Marcus Sounness, who was the underbidder on both of the top-priced rams, was successful on the $20,000 third-top priced ram.

Mr Sounness said he had gained Responsible Wool Standard certification early this year for his family’s non-mulesed flock.

“We sold our 150-bale woolclip well above evaluation through the auction system,” he said.

“I was looking for outcross sires from this year’s ram selections to work in our 200-head nucleus flock to breed flock rams for our 4500 head commercial ewe flock.”

Mr Sounness secured six rams for an average price of $8209. Also selecting off the top line, Esperance woolgrower John Wallace, who trades as Bakaara Farming, secured eight rams to a top of $7000 and average price of $4907.

Gibson producer Nils Blumann secured three rams to a top of $6000 and average price of $4917.

Volume buyers included Darkan woolgrower Jack South, who took home 10 rams to a top of $6000 and average price of $4375.

“We selected on worm egg count, early growth rate and fleece weight for our flock of 2500 ewes,” he said.

Tasmanian woolgrower Andrew Calvert, who trades as Wool Solutions, secured 11 rams to a top of $7000 and average price of $3205 for several Tasmanian clients.

Local buyer Emily Stretch, of Kojonup, secured eight rams for an average price of $2907.

DPIRD Katanning Research Facility acting manager Keren Muthsam with one of 19 rams she secured at the Anderson Rams annual sale.
Camera IconDPIRD Katanning Research Facility acting manager Keren Muthsam with one of 19 rams she secured at the Anderson Rams annual sale. Credit: Countryman

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s Katanning Research Facility acting manager Keren Muthsam secured five rams at the main auction and another 15 rams in a post-sale mini-action for a total average price of $1138.

“As first-time buyers, we were selecting for good maternal traits and easy-care types with good clean fleece weight for our ewe flock at the facility,” she said.

Nutrien Livestock stud stock agent Mitchell Crosby said the sale result was a credit to the Anderson family’s commitment in performance breeding with ASBVs.

“Buyers were looking for figures in carcase and wool plus a high resistance to worms,” he said.

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