Anderson ram nets a $10,400 record

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With the auction record top-priced ram, was Anderson Rams co-principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup, buyer Peter Smith, of Bremer Bay, and Nutrien Livestock Kojonup agent Troy Hornby.
Camera IconWith the auction record top-priced ram, was Anderson Rams co-principal Lynley Anderson, of Kojonup, buyer Peter Smith, of Bremer Bay, and Nutrien Livestock Kojonup agent Troy Hornby. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman, Bob Garnant

A Kojonup-bred Poll Merino ram that was the most worm-resistant ram ever offered at a sale in Australia has sold for a stud record auction price of $10,400.

Bremer Bay woolgrower Peter Smith bought the ram from Anderson Rams, dubbed “Australia’s most worm-resistant stud flock”.

A 10-year return buyer to the Anderson Rams sale, held last Wednesday in Kojonup, Mr Smith said the ram — Anderson Poll 190508 —was “the future”.

Anderson Rams co-principal Lynley Anderson said she was pleased to offer the most worm-resistant Poll Merinos in Australia.

Ms Anderson said out of the 2641 eligible sires, there was just one in the whole MerinoSelect database that was a trait leader for wrinkle, dag, adult fleece weight and the MP+ index — Anderson 160729.

“This sire is also a trait leader for post weaning weight, yearling weight, worm-resistance, staple length and staple strength and DP+ index,” she said.

Overall, the Andersons offered 150 rams and sold 147 through Nutrien Livestock at an average price of $2437, down $344/head on last year when all 114 rams sold for a record average price of $2781.

Missing this year was the presence of last year’s group of buyers from Victoria.

But through online bidding, their bids were successful through Nutrien Livestock stud stock agent Roy Addis, who secured a total of 47 rams for various clients for an average price of $2886.

Mr Addis, who secured rams from $1000 to a top of $4800, said many of the AuctionsPlus buyers were selecting for fertility and dual-purpose qualities, including meat carcase characteristics.

“It was good to see the volume of Merino Polls with comprehensive Australian Sheep Breeding Values,” he said.

AuctionsPlus was the under-bidder on the sale-topper and the second top-priced rams, but it was WA buyers who snapped up these higher-valued rams.

Mr Smith, who secured the sale-topper, said he would work the ram in a nucleus of 800 ewes to breed flock rams for his family’s 1200 commercial ewes.

“We breed rams for our own flock and also sell a few to our coastal neighbours,” he said.

Anderson Poll 190508 recorded a -93 for yearling faecal egg count, a figure in the top one per cent on MerinoSelect’s database.

The ram also recorded in the top 5 per cent for YWT (10.8), YFAT (1.9), YEMD (2.5), YCFW (31.3) and DP+ (187). The under-bidder on 190508, through AuctionsPlus, was Tasmania woolgrower Todd Michael, who manages a commercial flock of 3300 ewes on Bruny Island, 60km south of Hobart.

Mr Michael, who bought an Anderson stud ram last year, said he was selecting for good worm-resistance and a bit of extra fat and muscle for cold winter survival.

“We secured an earlier ram in the sale for $5000,” he said.

The Wiese family, of Highbury, returned to their fifth sale to also select one ram, successful on their first pick, Anderson Poll R5006 for the $8600 second-top price.

Tim Wiese said the ram was well balanced between its objective measurements and physical structure. “We began using these (Anderson) rams five years ago because the stud was measured for dual-purpose qualities,” he said

“The ram we liked today was consistently high in its ASBVs including fleece weight, body weight, faecal egg count, and eye muscle area. It was visu-ally well-grown with stylish wool.”

Mr Wiese said the ram would work in a nucleus of 700 ewes to breed flock rams for his family’s 6500 commercial flock.

New buyer Nev Mycock, of Kukerin, said he secured a big barrelled ram that was structurally correct.

Mr Mycop paid $4200 for his first Anderson Poll ram.

“We will put the ram over a nucleus of 100 ewes to breed flock rams for our commercial flock of 1800 head,” he said.

Volume buyer was the South family, of Darkan, who secured a total of 10 rams to a top of $4800 and average price of $2180.

Jack South said they selected for good yearling clean fleece weight, post weaning weight and clean wool. The Stretch family, of Kojonup, secured six rams for an average price of $2000 for their non-mulesed enterprise.

Emily Stretch said they selected for high worm-resistance, low breech wrinkle and low dag.

“We run a 5000-head non-mulesed flock,” she said.

Offered: 150

Sold: 147

Top price: $10,000

Average: $2437

Highbury woolgrower Bob Wiese, and his son Tim and his wife Sarah, secured the $8600 second top-priced ram.
Camera IconHighbury woolgrower Bob Wiese, and his son Tim and his wife Sarah, secured the $8600 second top-priced ram. Credit: Countryman
Kukerin woolgrower Nev Mycop was a first-time buyer.
Camera IconKukerin woolgrower Nev Mycop was a first-time buyer. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman, Bob Garnant
Darkan woolgrower Jack South secured 10 rams.
Camera IconDarkan woolgrower Jack South secured 10 rams. Credit: Countryman
Muresk Institue of Agriculture - DTWD farm technical officer Cameron Broun and farm manager Steve Mainwright secured two rams.
Camera IconMuresk Institue of Agriculture - DTWD farm technical officer Cameron Broun and farm manager Steve Mainwright secured two rams. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman, Bob Garnant
Anderson Rams stud technical assitant Maeve O'Brien.
Camera IconAnderson Rams stud technical assitant Maeve O'Brien. Credit: Countryman
Kojonup non-mulesed woolgrowers Emily and Nikki Stretch secured six rams.
Camera IconKojonup non-mulesed woolgrowers Emily and Nikki Stretch secured six rams. Credit: Countryman

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